[16] Lecturer, Student, Blackboard – The Academic Triangle

Lecturer, Student, Blackboard – The Academic Triangle

Author (s)

Ellen Spender Lecturer
School of Management

Abstract

Since I was an undergraduate in the early 1990’s, when emails and the internet were not readily available to the masses, technology has advance at an exponential rate. A time when both students and lecturers were mainly reliant on textbooks and attendance at lectures to gain knowledge. For students: attendance at classes was seen as the norm, attendance at classes was perceived as being the route to achievement, attendance at classes was deemed to be compulsory.

Fast forward to 2018 and can we view attendance at classes in the same way?

In 2016 I enrolled, once again, as a full-time student in order to experience, on a daily basis, the barriers students face today and concentrate on ways to break down those barriers. This presentation will focus on two aspects: firstly, the aspect of my return to learning and secondly, the changes facing my role as a lecturer in 2018 compared to 1999 when I first qualified. The focus will be on the role Blackboard played during my recent studies and the role it plays in my capacity as an Accounting lecturer in the School of Management – be in no doubt, Blackboard is a major player. The partnership in the learning process of teacher and student is persistently overshadowed by a third participant – Blackboard. Here I will take you on a journey through my studies and my role as a lecturer and give an insight into the role Blackboard plays in both.

The experiences of student and lecturer differ vastly yet they are both on a journey to one destination. As lecturers we aim to deliver knowledge in a way that students understand and retain that knowledge. Students expectations, aided by the fact that they are paying customers, have grown perhaps disproportionally in recent years.

Somewhere, sometime during the past 20 years there has been a shift in student expectations. More than ever, as lecturers, we construct our lectures and seminars around various pedagogies in an attempt to engage students, so why the frequent absences?

At the start of this academic year I decided to try to find out. Join me and discover my results when, and this may alarm some academic members of staff, I drastically cut the amount of resources I uploaded to Blackboard, including limited lecture slides and NO seminars resources.

Listen to the results of my study from semester 1 where all resources were uploaded to Blackboard compared with the results of semester 2 where limited resources were uploaded. I will share with you my assessment results and student mid-module feedback, in its unadulterated entirety.

The aim of this session is to explore the academic threesome: lecturer, student, and Blackboard and its role as facilitator or inhibitor. I will share my experience and good practice with colleagues so that delegates may be able to implement the findings/initiatives in their own practice. The session demonstrates an innovative approach because it is a real-life study. Dynamic and fluid.

Session Outline

Lecturer, Student, Blackboard – The Academic Triangle

Since I was an undergraduate in the early 1990’s, when emails and the internet were not readily available to the masses, technology has advance at an exponential rate. A time when both students and lecturers were mainly reliant on textbooks and attendance at lectures to gain knowledge. For students: attendance at classes was seen as the norm, attendance at classes was perceived as being the route to achievement, attendance at classes was deemed to be compulsory.

Fast forward to 2018 and can we view attendance at classes in the same way?

In 2016 I enrolled, once again, as a full-time student in order to experience, on a daily basis, the barriers students face today and concentrate on ways to break down those barriers. This presentation will focus on two aspects: firstly, the aspect of my return to learning and secondly, the changes facing my role as a lecturer in 2018 compared to 1999 when I first qualified. The focus will be on the role Blackboard played during my recent studies and the role it plays in my capacity as an Accounting lecturer in the School of Management – be in no doubt, Blackboard is a major player. The partnership in the learning process of teacher and student is persistently overshadowed by a third participant – Blackboard. Here I will take you on a journey through my studies and my role as a lecturer and give an insight into the role Blackboard plays in both.

The experiences of student and lecturer differ vastly yet they are both on a journey to one destination. As lecturers we aim to deliver knowledge in a way that students understand and retain that knowledge. Students expectations, aided by the fact that they are paying customers, have grown perhaps disproportionally in recent years.

Somewhere, sometime during the past 20 years there has been a shift in student expectations. More than ever, as lecturers, we construct our lectures and seminars around various pedagogies in an attempt to engage students, so why the frequent absences?

At the start of this academic year I decided to try to find out. Join me and discover my results when, and this may alarm some academic members of staff, I drastically cut the amount of resources I uploaded to Blackboard, including limited lecture slides and NO seminars resources.

Listen to the results of my study from semester 1 where all resources were uploaded to Blackboard compared with the results of semester 2 where limited resources were uploaded. I will share with you my assessment results and student mid-module feedback, in its unadulterated entirety.

The aim of this session is to explore the academic threesome: lecturer, student, and Blackboard and its role as facilitator or inhibitor. I will share my experience and good practice with colleagues so that delegates may be able to implement the findings/initiatives in their own practice. The session demonstrates an innovative approach because it is a real-life study. Dynamic and fluid.

Key Words

Blackboard, knowledge, engagement, resources, attendance

Key Messages

Good practice regarding Blackboard.

 

 

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